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Arunachal Pradesh History

In 1912-13 the British Indian government made agreements with the indigenous peoples of the Himalayas of northeastern India to set up the Balipara frontier tract in the west, the Sadiya frontier tract in the east, and the Abor and Mishmi hills and the Tirap frontier tract in the south. Together these tracts became the North East Frontier Agency, which is now Arunachal Pradesh. The northern boundary of the territory (now of the state) determined at that time became known as the McMahon Line; it is about 550 miles (885 km) long and has been a lasting point of contention between India and China.

The boundary takes its name from Sir Henry McMahon, secretary in the Indian foreign department and representative of Great Britain at the conference held in 1912–13 in Simla (now called Shimla, in the state of Himachal Pradesh) to settle frontier and other matters relating to Tibet. To the British, the line marked the geographic, ethnic, and administrative boundary between the two regions, and delegates from Great Britain, China, and Tibet agreed that the frontier between Tibet and northeastern India indeed should follow the crest of the high Himalayas. Two days later, however, the Chinese republican government disavowed its delegate and refused to sign a convention.

After the independence of India in 1947, China made claims to practically the whole area covered by the districts of East and West Kameng, Lower and Upper Subansiri, East and West Siang, and Lohit, arguing that the McMahon Line had never been accepted by China and was the result of British aggression. In letters to the Indian prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, the Chinese prime minister, Zhou Enlai, quoted a map in the 1929 edition of Encyclopædia Britannica showing the disputed territory as Chinese, with the boundary following the alignment of Chinese maps. Some Chinese maps before 1935 showed the North East Frontier Agency (Arunachal Pradesh) as part of India and since then as part of Tibet. The Survey of India (1883) showed the disputed tribal areas as de facto administered by British India. British and Indian maps since 1914 have usually followed the McMahon Line. If the Chinese claims were allowed, the Indian-Chinese border would follow roughly the margin of the Assam plain, a frontier almost impossible to defend. Following this dispute, Chinese troops crossed the McMahon Line on August 26, 1959, and captured an Indian outpost at Longju, a few miles south of the line. They abandoned this outpost in 1961, but in October 1962 they again crossed the line, this time in force. After first striking toward the Tanglha ridge and Tawang near the border with Bhutan, the Chinese later extended their attack along the whole frontier. Deep inroads were made at a number of points. Later the Chinese agreed to withdraw approximately to the McMahon Line, and in 1963 they returned Indian prisoners of war.

References:

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/37367/Arunachal-Pradesh/46121/History

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